Participant Profiles

Paper title: When Human Waste Enlivens: Designing commons of desirability

Author’s name: Markus Wernli

Author’s Affiliation: Urban Environments Lab, School of Design, Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Abstract: Enlivening design is a novel concept where citizen-designers promote simultaneously living organisms and revelatory ways of subjectivity development. Here the vital tension of mutually asserting relationships, desirability, and freedom of choice can help validate the technical and relational activities involved. This practice conjoins citizen-designers and scientists around the ecological reintegration of metabolic wastes and is aimed at bridging our prevalent nature-culture disconnect. The case study presented explores the transpersonal dynamics behind accepting visceral materiality and durational commitment which are little understood. This paper introduces a theoretical and applied understanding of participation design that embraces aliveness and outlines how in the face of complex issues creative potentials can be unlocked.

Short Bio: Markus Wernli’s research sits in the activist space between design, education, and bio- restorative practices for exploring socially transformative methods. Markus is currently completing his doctoral studies with the School of Design of Hong Kong Polytechnic University and previously held academic appointments at Australian National University and Zokei University of Art and Design in Kyoto.


Paper title: From Thing-ing to Musyawarah-ing: Adapting PD to democratic ideals in Indonesia

Author’s name: Tanja Rosenqvist

Author’s Affiliation: RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia

Abstract: While Participatory Design (PD) is increasingly applied across diverse cultural contexts, PD discourse remains tied to Scandinavian democratic history and ideals. Most prominently, contemporary PD literature draws links between design and the etymology of the word ‘Thing’ – a democratic gathering in ancient Northern European societies. While this concept provides a useful lens for planning and analysing PD projects in Scandinavia, it might be less useful and appropriate for PD taking place elsewhere. I suggest PD might be decolonised by drawing on and adapting to traditional approaches to democratic decision-making found in the specific cultural contexts in which PD takes place.

Short Bio: Tanja Rosenqvist is a transdisciplinary researcher who uses participatory design and co- design to empower vulnerable communities in the Asia-Pacific region. Her work explores the complex relationship between people, technologies, and governance structures, and topics such as water and sanitation service provision, disability inclusion, and maker cultures.


Paper title: Participatory Design Otherwise and quality education in Ecuadorian Amazonia

Author’s name: Nathaly Pinto

Author’s Affiliation: Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland

Abstract: Based on a wider, ongoing participatory design project, that focus on the local student community and the recognition of situated knowledge as part of quality education in Ecuadorian Amazonia. This position paper addresses a plural understanding of participation otherwise by exploring and proposing a set of context-sensible concepts and practical tools to broaden the reach of participatory design interventions within intercultural education. Through, in first instance, the exploration of a short emergency methodology and process that aims to assess the effect of the pandemic in Amazonian students’ condition and access to education, and to support university responses to the emergency.

Short Bio: I am doctoral student at Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture. My research focuses on design production and democracy: how can design support non-dominant culture citizens’ better representation and increase of participation. And I am interested on the impacts of design actions outside economic development concerns and how diverse participatory design interventions can support social innovation in practice.


Paper title: Exploring the lived experiences of Community Health Workers in Sudan using participatory design Approach

Author’s name: Muizz Siddig

Author’s Affiliation: PhD candidate, School of Design, University of Limerick, Ireland

Abstract: In this position paper I will discuss some of the challenges that may face my PhD journey in which I will explore the experiences and challenges of Community Health Workers from different stakeholders’ perspectives using participatory design (PD). Context-specific challenges when using traditional PD tools to develop and implement interventions in Sudan may prevent true participation. The entire process of research from ethics granting to data collection needs to be decolonized and designed to what it is culturally acceptable and comfortable to the Sudanese participants to ensure the desirable outcomes.

Short Bio: Muizz is a medical doctor who is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the School of Design, University of Limerick. He holds a master’s degree in international health from Uppsala University. His research interest revolves around addressing challenges embedded in health systems to deliver high-quality, cost-effective, person-centred healthcare services using design methods.


Paper title: Esoteric CV: A Decolonising Inquiry

Author’s name: Melisa Duque-Hurtado

Author’s Affiliation: Emerging Technologies Research Lab, Monash Art, Design and Architecture – MADA, Monash University, Melbourne Australia

Abstract: This paper presents an Esoteric CV exercise to open decolonising conversations. A proposal written for the PDC2020 workshop: Decolonising Participatory Design Practices, Towards Participations Otherwise. After a brief introduction that presents the objectives of this experimental proposal, this paper is composed by two main sections. First, I share a fragment of my esoteric cv. To illustrate the second section, where I discuss the potential value of this exercise for this workshop, for PD and design research more broadly. The notion of esoteric is crossed to emphasise tensions at the heart of legitimising knowledge systems that this paper aims to unpacks.

Short Bio: Melisa Duque is a Research Fellow in the Emerging Technologies Research Lab, and a full-time member of the Department of Design at Monash University. As a design researcher, her work sits at the intersection of Participatory Design, Design Anthropology, and Everyday Design.


Paper title: Autonomía-Led-Design: The use of Probes as a Decolonial Design Enabler

Author’s name: Lucia Trias Cornu

Author’s Affiliation: Montevideo-Berlin, Uruguay-Germany

Abstract: The idea of Autonomía has long been linked to liberation and anti-colonial movements in Latin America. Through the coming together of an autonomía-led-design perspective and the use of culture Probes as a means of connecting peoples with their ontologies. This work aims to visualize the potential of design research as an epistemological practice. The conclusions reached allow an understanding of how peoples experience design products and the social and cultural importance that this experience has. Moreover, the potential of Probes stands as a way for researching the different ontologies related to a same design.

Short Bio: Lucia Trias holds an MSc Design research as well as a four years’ degree on Industrial Design. Based in Berlin, her practice can be found at the intersection of participatory approaches and pluriversal design conceptions. She is particularly interested in understanding patterns in the formation of hegemonic forms of design.


Paper title: Decolonizing Participatory Design Practices: Towards a shared ownership of the design process

Author’s name: Lizette Carstens

Author’s Affiliation: Independent Institute of Education – Vega, Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract: Designers as shape-givers of a desired future, are well- positioned to respond to a global imperative to meet people’s basic needs, save the planet and build a fairer, more resilient society. However, this calls for a shift towards a decolonized, more inclusive design practice that acknowledges and respects diverse cultures, values and ways of knowing. Stakeholder participation during the design process gives participants a voice in shaping their own future, promotes inclusivity and the development of holistic, meaningful design solutions. Stakeholder participation requires a shift in the designer’s role from maker to facilitator of creativity. As facilitators, designers must develop new toolsets and ways of thinking about design practice, challenging personal ideas about “good” design and ownership of the design process.

Short Bio: As Academic Programme Manager for the IIE Vega’s design programmes, Lizette holds a Masters of Arts in Information Design from the University of Pretoria. Her interests lie in co-design and the democratisation of design education in South Africa. She is a post-graduate supervisor, facilitates co-design workshops, and is a member of the Design Educators’ Forum of South Africa.


Paper title: Indigenising design practices: Critical Co-Design as a methodology to privilege Indigenous knowledge and people

Author’s name: Desiree Ibinarriaga

Author’s Affiliation: Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Abstract: This paper discusses and considers the recognition of Indigenous people, knowledge and place within co-design practices. It also presents a methodology called Critical Co-Design that extents such practices and approaches as a generative process of design that aims to privilege Indigenous ways of knowing and doing, particularly in conversation with the researchers/designers. The methodology is grounded on acknowledging the interconnection between relationality, people, Country, place and identity (positionality) seeking practical and beneficial outcomes towards biocultural conservation and regeneration; this through the Biocultural Workshop supporting the practice and knowledge production of the methodology. Critical Co-Design is a bottom-up methodology as it focusses on opportunities, seeing Indigenous people as a wise society that holds ancestral knowledge.

Short Bio: Desiree Ibinarriaga, industrial and social designer from Mexico, Lecturer at Monash University. She is advocated to collaborate with Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples through the co-design field since 2012, acknowledging the importance of biocultural diversity, Indigenous Ecological Knowledge towards collaborative resilience, cultural identity pride and sustainability.


Paper title: The ‘design place’: a participant entangled in PD

Author’s name: Bronwyn J. Cumbo

Author’s Affiliation: Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Abstract: “Participation” in (PD) is commonly understood to be a process of mutual learning between human actors, whilst nonhuman actors are considered hosts or tools to support mutual learning. Here, we scrutinize this human-centred perspective of participation through an ethnographic study of the nature-play practice of nine children (7-11 years). By conceptualizing play as a child-led, emplaced form of participation, children reveal that their natural play place is not only a support of play, but a vital participant in their practice. We conclude with three recommendations for designers to critically reflect on the role and influence of the design ‘place’ in PD.

Short Bio: My research explores how creative, critical and participatory approaches to design can inspire and enable social change in urban contexts. I am particularly interested in how the participatory design of digital technologies can build connections between children and nature and promote environmental stewardship behaviour.


Paper title: Decolonizing in, by and through design with political activists in Palestine

Author’s name: Rachel Clarke

Author’s Affiliation: Open Lab, Newcastle University, UK

Abstract: References to decolonizing design have gained traction in recent years as both an intellectual and practice-based endeavour. It is particularly relevant when working with communities experiencing long histories of oppression. This position paper outlines current research with activists in Palestine. The paper draws attention to different objectives in working towards decolonizing practices that speak to multiple unsettling agendas and concerns within participatory design. The terms in, by and through are used to distinguish between these practices to pull focus on different agendas. Emphasis is placed on unpacking the preposition of decolonizing in design practice through responding to issues of incommensurability.

Short Bio: I am a Senior Lecturer in Interaction Design and Digital Sustainability research lead at Open Lab, Newcastle University. My background is in human-computer interaction (HCI) and feminist science and technology studies (STS) with research interests in collaborative participatory practices using technology with those experiencing marginalisation and displacement.


Paper title: Deep entanglements and receptivity to plural relationalities

Author’s name: Yoko Akama

Author’s Affiliation: School of Design, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia

Abstract: I live and work on East Kulin land (Melbourne), and this obliges me to call on one’s entire relationality – ancestry, family, place where one’s from – to an encounter towards building relationships. Respecting our deep entanglements teaches us the wisdom of history and embrace the pain in family stories. Acknowledging our positionalities and how we are all already entangled means these are dynamically shifting. This means who I am becoming is always changing in relation to people, spaces, time, situations, occasions and our states of being. The fluidity in which one is with others is important for emptiness for such encounters and to always becoming-with-many.

Short Bio: Yoko Akama is Associate Professor in the School of Design, RMIT University. Her practice is shaped by various Japanese philosophies of between-ness and mindfulness, to consider how plural futures can be designed together. She is a recipient of several national and international awards for collaborative work with self-determining Indigenous nations and regional communities preparing for disaster.


Paper title: Participation otherwise: Practices by/from the Global South

Author’s name: Bibiana Serpa

Author’s Affiliation: Design Anthropology Laboratory, Superior School of Industrial Design, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Abstract: In response to Arturo Escobar’s invitation to design new worlds, it is fundamental to map forms of participation often silenced by hegemonic practices of participatory design (PD). In this full day interactive workshop, we hope to map practices of Participatory Design Otherwise, and reflect about what does it means to participate by/from the Global South, especially Latin America. Our intention is to make visible the nature and territoriality of these ways of doing. Understanding that this event will be held for the first time in Latin America, we seek a theoretical alignment with Latin American thinkers, running this workshop based on the techniques and methods of Theatre of the Oppressed, developed by Augusto Boal. We will also use references inspired by black and indigenous ancestry, as the “Pedagogia das Encruzilhadas (the Pedagogy of the Crossroads) and the “Pedagogia do Parente” (Relative’s Pedagogy). As indigenous leader Ailton Krenak says, we need to “postponing the end of the world” by nurturing our subjectivities and expand our horizons to other creativities and narratives. That’s what we expect to see in this rich encounter.

Short Bio: I am a PhD student and researcher at the Design and Anthropology Laboratory of the Superior School of Industrial Design (ESDI/UERJ), in Rio de Janeiro. As a designer, I study how to politicize teaching-learning design in collective and participative processes. As a feminist, I am a militant and an social educator engaged with political education for women. I try to relate methodologies in critical and popular education to design. 


Paper title: Participation otherwise: Practices by/from the Global South

Author’s name: Sâmia Batista

Author’s Affiliation: Design Anthropology Laboratory, Superior School of Industrial Design, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Abstract: In response to Arturo Escobar’s invitation to design new worlds, it is fundamental to map forms of participation often silenced by hegemonic practices of participatory design (PD). In this full day interactive workshop, we hope to map practices of Participatory Design Otherwise, and reflect about what does it means to participate by/from the Global South, especially Latin America. Our intention is to make visible the nature and territoriality of these ways of doing. Understanding that this event will be held for the first time in Latin America, we seek a theoretical alignment with Latin American thinkers, running this workshop based on the techniques and methods of Theatre of the Oppressed, developed by Augusto Boal. We will also use references inspired by black and indigenous ancestry, as the “Pedagogia das Encruzilhadas (the Pedagogy of the Crossroads) and the “Pedagogia do Parente” (Relative’s Pedagogy). As indigenous leader Ailton Krenak says, we need to “postponing the end of the world” by nurturing our subjectivities and expand our horizons to other creativities and narratives. That’s what we expect to see in this rich encounter.

Short Bio: I’m a designer from the northern region of Brazil, where I try to research how design centered on an industrial and western vision influences the design teached, percepted and produced at Amazon. I currently collaborate with the Design and Anthropology Laboratory of the Superior School of Industrial Design (ESDI/UERJ), in Rio de Janeiro, where I am a Phd student.


Author’s name: Edgard David Rincón Quijano

Author’s Affiliation: Design Department, Universidad del Norte

Short Bio: Industrial Designer with an industrial design master’s degree and Ph.D. Candidate in Design and Creation from Universidad de Caldas. His Experience focuses in Product Development, project management, and technology transfer within technological and social development projects. Mainly applying participatory design for public institutions, companies, foundations, NGOs, and communities directly. Today is an Assistant Professor for the Design Department at Universidad del Norte and a member of the DESIS Network Association.

As teacher and a researcher had worked together with his students on strengthening the dynamics of social innovation through Design. Currently, Accompanies processes of community empowerment through design interventions and strengthening social entrepreneurship initiatives. His current research interest is on Reflection as a dialogic resource in design for social transformation practices.


Author’s name: Pablo Giraldo Bustamante

Author’s Affiliation: Researcher, Interactive Design, University of Caldas

Short Bio: Pablo Giraldo Bustamante, Researcher on Interactive Design, of University of Caldas, Specialist in Webmaster, and worker on virtual education environments with a special character multi- cultural and with own words and thoughts, co-design, communication red of Abya Yala people and Revitalize the spaces, research about technology in the sacred spaces of ancient knowledge and wisdom and long distance education. 


Author’s name: Laura Boffi

Author’s Affiliation: Interaction Design Researcher and Practitioner

Short Bio: Laura Boffi is an interaction design researcher and practitioner with a background in product design. She likes engaging with people in their own context, conducting fieldwork and involving them in design games, workshops and co-creation sessions that she designs expressly for the projects to gain meaningful insights. She holds a BA in industrial design from the Polytechnic of Turin, an MA in Design from the Design Academy Eindhoven and a diploma in Interaction Design from the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design CIID. Laura collaborates from her own studio as an interaction designer and researcher with international companies and consultancies, takes part in EU funded projects, as well as gives invited lectures & workshops in academia. She nurtures her own design interests through self-initiated projects, which she eventually manages to fund through public grants or funds and private sponsorships, such as the case of her recent endeavour, “The Storytellers Project,” which was funded by the EU. Since 2018, Laura holds a Phd scholarship from the University of Ferrara to pursue her design research on the interactions between autonomous cars & people, entitled “Cars with an Intent”, with the technical collaboration of Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna di Pisa, Italy.

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